Infertility

Comprehensive Resources and Links

Our comprehensive patient educational resources provides easy access to various clinical information, easy-to-understand descriptions, causes, warning signs and symptoms, treatment options, prevention techniques and more.  

We encourage you to contact our practice if you have questions, concerns or require a consulttaion or treatment.

Contraception

At Suffolk OBGYN we recognize that contraception is a very personal choice and as medical providers specializing in woman's health we are dedicated to providing information and access about contraception choices for patient review and consideration.  Birth control methods to prevent pregnancy include progestin only pills and injections; combined estrogen and progestin pills, patches, and the vaginal ring; long acting reversible contraception (LARC) including the intrauterine device (IUD) and implant; barrier methods including the diaphragm, sponge, cervical cap, and condom.

When it comes to birth control, women have more options than ever. But more choices mean there’s a lot more to consider. So how can you choose which pregnancy prevention method is right for you?

The most important step is to weigh your options with your doctor. You’ll want to find out how each form of birth control will affect your health. Factors like high blood pressure, your smoking habits, and a history of breast caner should all have an impact on your selection.

The most popular forms of birth control in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, are oral contraception, tubal ligation (having your tubes tied), and condoms. While no one method is foolproof, the IUD is a T-shaped device that's inserted into the uterus by your doctor and is very effective in preventing pregnancy. 

In addition to preventing pregnancy, condoms provide some protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, other birth control methods do not provide protection against STDs, so condoms should also be used.

Pregnancy

Infertility

Educational Resource Links

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

WEbMD

Mayo Clinic

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Mother to Baby 

Breastfeeding

Baby Name Database

Menpoause

Mobile Apps

WebMD Symptom Checker

My Days-Period & Ovulation Tracker

My Pill-Birth Control Reminder

Ibirth Contraction Timer

 

 

 

Infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after one year of regular, unprotected sex. This span is shortened to six months if the woman is over the age of 35. Women who can become pregnant but are unable to sustain the pregnancy may also considered be infertile. Approximately a third of infertility cases originate with the man, another third from the woman. The other cases may be due to problems with both partners, or due to an unknown cause.

Male infertility may be due to low sperm count, sperm damage or varicocele, which is a malformation of a vein in the scrotum. Smoking, alcohol and drug use, obesity, untreated sexually transmitted infections, and certain medications or medical treatments may also contribute to sperm abnormalities.

Women's fertility can be affected by many of the same risk factors as men, but they may also have problems within the ovaries or uterus such as endometriosis or uterine fibroids. Women who are underweight or those who are over the age of 35 may also experience difficulty conceiving. In both genders, there may be a singular reason for infertility or a combination of causes.

There are many treatments available for infertility. Basic screening is usually performed first - ­physical exams, sperm studies, ovulation tests and ultrasounds. After analysis of these tests, the doctor will make recommendations for treating the problem. This may include increasing sexual activity, medication, or surgery.

Assisted conception may also be an option for some couples; medical procedures are carried out by fertility specialists with the goal of conception. These include in vitro fertilization and the use of donor eggs. These methods have varying levels of success and can have risk factors associated with them. Maintaining a relationship with a doctor as well as a counselor is beneficial.