Annual Gynecological Exams

Comprehensive Resources and Links

Our comprehensive patient educational resources provides easy access to various clinical information, easy-to-understand descriptions, causes, warning signs and symptoms, treatment options, prevention techniques and more.  

We encourage you to contact our practice if you have questions, concerns or require a consulttaion or treatment.

Contraception

At Suffolk OBGYN we recognize that contraception is a very personal choice and as medical providers specializing in woman's health we are dedicated to providing information and access about contraception choices for patient review and consideration.  Birth control methods to prevent pregnancy include progestin only pills and injections; combined estrogen and progestin pills, patches, and the vaginal ring; long acting reversible contraception (LARC) including the intrauterine device (IUD) and implant; barrier methods including the diaphragm, sponge, cervical cap, and condom.

When it comes to birth control, women have more options than ever. But more choices mean there’s a lot more to consider. So how can you choose which pregnancy prevention method is right for you?

The most important step is to weigh your options with your doctor. You’ll want to find out how each form of birth control will affect your health. Factors like high blood pressure, your smoking habits, and a history of breast caner should all have an impact on your selection.

The most popular forms of birth control in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, are oral contraception, tubal ligation (having your tubes tied), and condoms. While no one method is foolproof, the IUD is a T-shaped device that's inserted into the uterus by your doctor and is very effective in preventing pregnancy. 

In addition to preventing pregnancy, condoms provide some protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, other birth control methods do not provide protection against STDs, so condoms should also be used.

Pregnancy

Infertility

Educational Resource Links

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

WEbMD

Mayo Clinic

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Mother to Baby 

Breastfeeding

Baby Name Database

Menpoause

Mobile Apps

WebMD Symptom Checker

My Days-Period & Ovulation Tracker

My Pill-Birth Control Reminder

Ibirth Contraction Timer

 

 

 

Have you been to your OB/GYN for your annual exam? While receiving an annual exam may not always be pleasant, they are key to ensuring your good health as you age.

The Importance of Annual Exams

Annual gynecological exams serve a number of purposes. The most important is to diagnose any abnormalities as quickly as possible. The sooner you begin treatment, the better your chances of managing or recovering from a condition will be. By going in for annual exams, you may catch a potentially dangerous disease before it’s too late.

At What Age Should Women Begin Getting Annual Exams

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that girls begin seeing for annual exams as early as thirteen years old, though these check­ups won't be as comprehensive as later exams. Pelvic exams and Pap tests generally begin around age 21. Of course, women are always encouraged to see their doctors sooner if there is any cause for concern.

What Happens at an Annual Exam?

At your annual exam, the nurse and doctor will check you over to ensure you are in good health. They will start by taking your health history if they don't have it on file already. Then the nurse will take your measurements and vital signs, including your height, weight, blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and temperature.

The doctor will examine your body to see that everything is in order. Depending on the type of exam, your doctor may also check your breasts and pelvis, either manually or by performing a Pap test.

Because annual tests can be a little invasive, and because you should plan to have one every year, it is important to find a knowledgeable OB/GYN that you trust. If you have any nervousness about the exam, talk to your doctor. They can address any of your questions or concerns.