Ovarian Cysts

Comprehensive Resources and Links

Our comprehensive patient educational resources provides easy access to various clinical information, easy-to-understand descriptions, causes, warning signs and symptoms, treatment options, prevention techniques and more.  

We encourage you to contact our practice if you have questions, concerns or require a consulttaion or treatment.

Contraception

At Suffolk OBGYN we recognize that contraception is a very personal choice and as medical providers specializing in woman's health we are dedicated to providing information and access about contraception choices for patient review and consideration.  Birth control methods to prevent pregnancy include progestin only pills and injections; combined estrogen and progestin pills, patches, and the vaginal ring; long acting reversible contraception (LARC) including the intrauterine device (IUD) and implant; barrier methods including the diaphragm, sponge, cervical cap, and condom.

When it comes to birth control, women have more options than ever. But more choices mean there’s a lot more to consider. So how can you choose which pregnancy prevention method is right for you?

The most important step is to weigh your options with your doctor. You’ll want to find out how each form of birth control will affect your health. Factors like high blood pressure, your smoking habits, and a history of breast caner should all have an impact on your selection.

The most popular forms of birth control in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, are oral contraception, tubal ligation (having your tubes tied), and condoms. While no one method is foolproof, the IUD is a T-shaped device that's inserted into the uterus by your doctor and is very effective in preventing pregnancy. 

In addition to preventing pregnancy, condoms provide some protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, other birth control methods do not provide protection against STDs, so condoms should also be used.

Pregnancy

Infertility

Educational Resource Links

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

WEbMD

Mayo Clinic

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Mother to Baby 

Breastfeeding

Baby Name Database

Menpoause

Mobile Apps

WebMD Symptom Checker

My Days-Period & Ovulation Tracker

My Pill-Birth Control Reminder

Ibirth Contraction Timer

 

 

 

What are Ovarian Cysts?

Ovarian cysts are pockets of fluid that form on the surface of a woman's ovary. Ovarian cysts are very common, and most women have one away on their own without treatment.

Symptoms

Ovarian cysts do not always cause symptoms. When they do, the symptoms can include loss of appetite, nausea, weight gain, frequent urination, breast tenderness or a feeling of heaviness in the abdomen. They may also cause pain, particularly pelvic pain shortly before or after a period, during intercourse or during bowel movements.

Call the doctor right away if your pain is accompanied by fever or vomiting, if your abdominal pain is sudden and severe, or if you have cold, clammy skin, lightheadedness or rapid breathing, as these are all signs of a medical emergency.

Types of Ovarian Cysts

Ovarian cysts are typically classified into various types based on their sources and causes. Functional cysts, for example, form during ovulation when an egg is not properly released from the follicle. Dermoid cysts form from cells that produce human eggs and may contain human tissue, teeth or hair. Endometriomas develop when uterine endometrial cells attach to an ovary and form a growth. Cystadenomas develop from ovarian tissue.

Ovarian Cyst Treatment Options

The most common treatment option for ovarian cysts is simply to wait and see. Since most cysts are not harmful and they tend to go away on their own within a few cycles, more invasive measures are generally not needed. Alternately, some doctors will prescribe birth control pill, which can inhibit the growth and formation of new ovarian cysts.

If these less invasive treatment methods do not prove effective, more invasive measures will be needed. Other, more invasive, treatment options for ovarian cysts do include surgery. These generally are not used unless the cysts are causing problems or refuse to go away on their own, however.