Prenatal Visits

Comprehensive Resources and Links

Our comprehensive patient educational resources provides easy access to various clinical information, easy-to-understand descriptions, causes, warning signs and symptoms, treatment options, prevention techniques and more.  

We encourage you to contact our practice if you have questions, concerns or require a consulttaion or treatment.

Contraception

At Suffolk OBGYN we recognize that contraception is a very personal choice and as medical providers specializing in woman's health we are dedicated to providing information and access about contraception choices for patient review and consideration.  Birth control methods to prevent pregnancy include progestin only pills and injections; combined estrogen and progestin pills, patches, and the vaginal ring; long acting reversible contraception (LARC) including the intrauterine device (IUD) and implant; barrier methods including the diaphragm, sponge, cervical cap, and condom.

When it comes to birth control, women have more options than ever. But more choices mean there’s a lot more to consider. So how can you choose which pregnancy prevention method is right for you?

The most important step is to weigh your options with your doctor. You’ll want to find out how each form of birth control will affect your health. Factors like high blood pressure, your smoking habits, and a history of breast caner should all have an impact on your selection.

The most popular forms of birth control in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, are oral contraception, tubal ligation (having your tubes tied), and condoms. While no one method is foolproof, the IUD is a T-shaped device that's inserted into the uterus by your doctor and is very effective in preventing pregnancy. 

In addition to preventing pregnancy, condoms provide some protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, other birth control methods do not provide protection against STDs, so condoms should also be used.

Pregnancy

Infertility

Educational Resource Links

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

WEbMD

Mayo Clinic

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Mother to Baby 

Breastfeeding

Baby Name Database

Menpoause

Mobile Apps

WebMD Symptom Checker

My Days-Period & Ovulation Tracker

My Pill-Birth Control Reminder

Ibirth Contraction Timer

 

 

 

What is a Prenatal Visit?

A prenatal visit is a routine visit you make to your doctor or midwife while pregnant. You should expect to make several visits to your doctor or midwife throughout the course of your pregnancy.

When Should I Schedule My First Prenatal Visit?

The date of your first visit depends on a number of factors, depending how far along you were when you found out about the pregnancy, your health history, and your doctor's policies. Generally, your best option is to call your OB/GYN as soon as you find out you are pregnant, and they will let you know when to come in.

How Often Will I Have Prenatal Visits?

Most doctors will have you come in every four weeks throughout your first and second trimester. During the third trimester, you will likely come in every two weeks at first, and then every week once you hit 36 weeks. Of course, if you have health concerns which put your pregnancy at greater risk, you may need to come in a little more frequently. Your doctor will let you know.

Because of how frequently you can expect to see your doctor throughout the course of your pregnancy, choosing one you like and feel comfortable with is essential.

What Happens at a Prenatal Visit?

While each visit may differ slightly, here is what you can expect at a prenatal visit: At the first visit, the doctor or nurse will likely take your medical history and your vital signs, including your height, weight and blood pressure. The doctor will listen to baby's heartbeat and feel and measure your abdomen. Occasionally, you will give a urine or blood sample and you'll probably have an ultrasound or two. Toward the end of your pregnancy, your doctor will also check to see how far dilated you are.

Your doctor should also talk to you about any questions or concerns you have and instruct you on how to best care for yourself and your growing baby. Don't be afraid to ask questions, especially if this is your first pregnancy or if something doesn't seem right.

Prenatal visits are routine, so don't be surprised if they are fairly short after the first one. The doctor simply wants to check to make sure everything is looking okay, and if it is, you should be good to go until your next appointment!