Childbirth Settings

Comprehensive Resources and Links

Our comprehensive patient educational resources provides easy access to various clinical information, easy-to-understand descriptions, causes, warning signs and symptoms, treatment options, prevention techniques and more.  

We encourage you to contact our practice if you have questions, concerns or require a consulttaion or treatment.

Contraception

At Suffolk OBGYN we recognize that contraception is a very personal choice and as medical providers specializing in woman's health we are dedicated to providing information and access about contraception choices for patient review and consideration.  Birth control methods to prevent pregnancy include progestin only pills and injections; combined estrogen and progestin pills, patches, and the vaginal ring; long acting reversible contraception (LARC) including the intrauterine device (IUD) and implant; barrier methods including the diaphragm, sponge, cervical cap, and condom.

When it comes to birth control, women have more options than ever. But more choices mean there’s a lot more to consider. So how can you choose which pregnancy prevention method is right for you?

The most important step is to weigh your options with your doctor. You’ll want to find out how each form of birth control will affect your health. Factors like high blood pressure, your smoking habits, and a history of breast caner should all have an impact on your selection.

The most popular forms of birth control in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, are oral contraception, tubal ligation (having your tubes tied), and condoms. While no one method is foolproof, the IUD is a T-shaped device that's inserted into the uterus by your doctor and is very effective in preventing pregnancy. 

In addition to preventing pregnancy, condoms provide some protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, other birth control methods do not provide protection against STDs, so condoms should also be used.

Pregnancy

Infertility

Educational Resource Links

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

WEbMD

Mayo Clinic

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Mother to Baby 

Breastfeeding

Baby Name Database

Menpoause

Mobile Apps

WebMD Symptom Checker

My Days-Period & Ovulation Tracker

My Pill-Birth Control Reminder

Ibirth Contraction Timer

 

 

 

While most people immediately think of giving birth in a hospital, you may be surprised to hear that you do have other options, including home births and birth centers. Read on to find out which birthing option is best for you!

Hospital

Pros: Hospitals have plenty of emergency personnel on hand, so if anything goes wrong, you are in good hands. If you or your baby have any complications, a fully stocked and staffed OR and NICU are generally just an elevator ride away. Hospitals are the only option for patients who require a C­-section, and are recommended for patients who have a high­-risk pregnancy. Hospitals also offer round­-the-clock help.

Cons: Hospitals often have many strict guidelines, policies, rules and red tape that can interfere with a mother's birth plan. Mother and baby are also often separated following the birth.

Home Birth

Pros: The mother is allowed to give birth in a familiar, relaxing environment. She has much more control over the birth process, and can move around, eat, drink, shower and dress as she pleases. Children are welcome to attend. The cost of home birth is typically lower than the cost of a hospital birth. A trained midwife is generally still present to make sure everything goes well.

Cons: Home birth may not be an option for women who are having twins or who have health conditions or complications, including diabetes, hypertension or preeclampsia. It is not an option for women who need a C­-section. If something goes wrong, the mother and baby will still need to be transferred to the hospital. There are also no at-­home options for pain relief.

Birth Center

Pros: A middle ground between a hospital and a home birth, birth centers take a natural, family centered approach to birth, while still offering low­-tech medical interventions. Mothers have more freedom to give birth as they want than in a hospital setting. Pain relief options are often available. Certified nurse-­midwives will typically care for the mother during birth. Childbirth is viewed as a normal, safe, and healthy process, but precautions are taken just in case. Many birth centers are now located inside hospitals, meaning that transfer to the hospital proper in case of an emergency would be faster.

Cons: Dedicated birth centers have rigid requirements and usually only accept low­-risk pregnancies. Mothers must still be transported to the hospital in case of a serious emergency, and while birth centers are more comfortable and relaxed than a hospital, they still aren't home.

Hospitals, home births and dedicated birth centers are all excellent choices for different women. Speak to your doctor about your risk level and birthing requirements to see which option is best for you.