Postpartum Care

Comprehensive Resources and Links

Our comprehensive patient educational resources provides easy access to various clinical information, easy-to-understand descriptions, causes, warning signs and symptoms, treatment options, prevention techniques and more.  

We encourage you to contact our practice if you have questions, concerns or require a consulttaion or treatment.

Contraception

At Suffolk OBGYN we recognize that contraception is a very personal choice and as medical providers specializing in woman's health we are dedicated to providing information and access about contraception choices for patient review and consideration.  Birth control methods to prevent pregnancy include progestin only pills and injections; combined estrogen and progestin pills, patches, and the vaginal ring; long acting reversible contraception (LARC) including the intrauterine device (IUD) and implant; barrier methods including the diaphragm, sponge, cervical cap, and condom.

When it comes to birth control, women have more options than ever. But more choices mean there’s a lot more to consider. So how can you choose which pregnancy prevention method is right for you?

The most important step is to weigh your options with your doctor. You’ll want to find out how each form of birth control will affect your health. Factors like high blood pressure, your smoking habits, and a history of breast caner should all have an impact on your selection.

The most popular forms of birth control in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, are oral contraception, tubal ligation (having your tubes tied), and condoms. While no one method is foolproof, the IUD is a T-shaped device that's inserted into the uterus by your doctor and is very effective in preventing pregnancy. 

In addition to preventing pregnancy, condoms provide some protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, other birth control methods do not provide protection against STDs, so condoms should also be used.

Pregnancy

Infertility

Educational Resource Links

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

WEbMD

Mayo Clinic

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Mother to Baby 

Breastfeeding

Baby Name Database

Menpoause

Mobile Apps

WebMD Symptom Checker

My Days-Period & Ovulation Tracker

My Pill-Birth Control Reminder

Ibirth Contraction Timer

 

 

 

Giving birth is a beautiful, natural process, but it can also take quite a toll on your body. Thankfully, there are plenty of tips and products out there designed to make your recovery easier. Here is what nurses and experienced moms everywhere recommend.

Pain Reduction

Find out if your hospital offers special ice packs to new mothers, and if they don't, make your own. They are bulky, but they will help. Dermoplast pain spray helps immensely too. Line your sanitary napkin with a witch hazel pad to ease the itchiness of any stitches. Recline or lay down rather than sitting straight up. It is normal to feel contraction, similar in pain to menstrual cramps, after birth. These tend to worsen with every successive pregnancy.

For the Bleeding

You will bleed for several weeks after birth. Either wear the underwear the hospital provides or your own underwear you don't care about with a giant pad. Some women opt for adult diapers. Your bleeding should gradually slow and turn from bright red to brown. Call your doctor right away if you soak a pad within an hour, you pass clots larger than a golf ball or your vaginal discharge smells foul.

For Your Breasts

Your milk probably won't come in for a day or two after birth. If your breasts are painfully full, you may pump or feed a little for relief, but be careful not to overdo it as your body produces milk on a supply -and­-demand basis.

It is normal for breastfeeding to hurt at first. Make sure baby is latched on correctly and use Lanolin cream to help with any cracking or bleeding. Alternate which side you feed on and wear nursing pads to catch any leaking, especially at first.

If you are not planning on breastfeeding, wear a compression bra and do not pump. Cold washcloths can help with the pain.

Using the Bathroom

Use a squirt bottle when you urinate for the first few days to relieve the stinging. If you find yourself leaking small amounts of urine throughout the day, doing Kegels can help. If you have hemorrhoids, witch hazel pads can soothe them. If your stools are hard and painful, be sure to drink plenty of water and consume enough fruits and vegetables. Your doctor may also recommend a stool softener. You may find it helpful to take a sitz bath afterwards.

Other

Rest as much as possible, and don't be afraid to ask for help. Do not drive or carry anything over 10 pounds for a week. Realize that mood swings are normal, but if you are worried you have postpartum depression, talk to your doctor right away. Worry about taking care of yourself and your baby before you worry about weight loss.

After about six weeks, you’ll check in with your healthcare provider. This is the time to discuss any symptoms still troubling you and look at your progress so far. All in all, take things at your own pace, and try to enjoy these first precious weeks after your delivery!