Menopause

Comprehensive Resources and Links

Our comprehensive patient educational resources provides easy access to various clinical information, easy-to-understand descriptions, causes, warning signs and symptoms, treatment options, prevention techniques and more.  

We encourage you to contact our practice if you have questions, concerns or require a consulttaion or treatment.

Contraception

At Suffolk OBGYN we recognize that contraception is a very personal choice and as medical providers specializing in woman's health we are dedicated to providing information and access about contraception choices for patient review and consideration.  Birth control methods to prevent pregnancy include progestin only pills and injections; combined estrogen and progestin pills, patches, and the vaginal ring; long acting reversible contraception (LARC) including the intrauterine device (IUD) and implant; barrier methods including the diaphragm, sponge, cervical cap, and condom.

When it comes to birth control, women have more options than ever. But more choices mean there’s a lot more to consider. So how can you choose which pregnancy prevention method is right for you?

The most important step is to weigh your options with your doctor. You’ll want to find out how each form of birth control will affect your health. Factors like high blood pressure, your smoking habits, and a history of breast caner should all have an impact on your selection.

The most popular forms of birth control in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, are oral contraception, tubal ligation (having your tubes tied), and condoms. While no one method is foolproof, the IUD is a T-shaped device that's inserted into the uterus by your doctor and is very effective in preventing pregnancy. 

In addition to preventing pregnancy, condoms provide some protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, other birth control methods do not provide protection against STDs, so condoms should also be used.

Pregnancy

Infertility

Educational Resource Links

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

WEbMD

Mayo Clinic

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Mother to Baby 

Breastfeeding

Baby Name Database

Menpoause

Mobile Apps

WebMD Symptom Checker

My Days-Period & Ovulation Tracker

My Pill-Birth Control Reminder

Ibirth Contraction Timer

 

 

 

Menopause is a natural and expected hormonal shift that marks the end the childbearing age with the cessation of the menstrual cycle. Nearly all women go through this change at some point in their lives, with the vast majority of women experiencing it between the ages of 40 and 60. Menopause can happen earlier, however, as the result of medical interventions. Menopause is considered official when a woman misses 12 menstrual cycles in a row.

What are Common Menopause Symptoms?

Irregular periods and hot flashes are the menopause symptoms that are the most well known, but the symptoms don't end there. Women going through menopause often also experience vaginal dryness, night sweats, mood changes and loss of breast fullness. Sleep problems, a slowed metabolism, weight gain and thinning hair are all common menopause symptoms as well.

Any bleeding or spotting after menopause is complete is not normal. Consult with your doctor right away if you notice any of these symptoms, especially if you thought you were done having menstrual cycles.

What Causes Menopause?

When menopause occurs naturally, it happens as a result of the natural decline in reproductive hormones that occurs as women age. Menopause can also occur as the result of a hysterectomy, radiation or chemotherapy.

What Menopause Treatments are Available?

Common treatments for menopause are not designed to reverse the condition, but rather to alleviate any annoying, painful or inconvenient symptoms that accompany it and to make the transition easier for the women going through it. For example, the first measures doctors will generally recommend include eating a better diet, exercising, getting enough sleep, quitting smoking and wearing layers to help prevent overheating during a hot flash.

For women whose symptoms are more serious, doctors may also recommend treatments including hormone therapy, antidepressants, medications and supplements. If you think you may be going through menopause, talk to your doctor about your symptoms and ask which treatment method might be right for you.