Vaginal Prolapse

Comprehensive Resources and Links

Our comprehensive patient educational resources provides easy access to various clinical information, easy-to-understand descriptions, causes, warning signs and symptoms, treatment options, prevention techniques and more.  

We encourage you to contact our practice if you have questions, concerns or require a consulttaion or treatment.

Contraception

At Suffolk OBGYN we recognize that contraception is a very personal choice and as medical providers specializing in woman's health we are dedicated to providing information and access about contraception choices for patient review and consideration.  Birth control methods to prevent pregnancy include progestin only pills and injections; combined estrogen and progestin pills, patches, and the vaginal ring; long acting reversible contraception (LARC) including the intrauterine device (IUD) and implant; barrier methods including the diaphragm, sponge, cervical cap, and condom.

When it comes to birth control, women have more options than ever. But more choices mean there’s a lot more to consider. So how can you choose which pregnancy prevention method is right for you?

The most important step is to weigh your options with your doctor. You’ll want to find out how each form of birth control will affect your health. Factors like high blood pressure, your smoking habits, and a history of breast caner should all have an impact on your selection.

The most popular forms of birth control in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, are oral contraception, tubal ligation (having your tubes tied), and condoms. While no one method is foolproof, the IUD is a T-shaped device that's inserted into the uterus by your doctor and is very effective in preventing pregnancy. 

In addition to preventing pregnancy, condoms provide some protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, other birth control methods do not provide protection against STDs, so condoms should also be used.

Pregnancy

Infertility

Educational Resource Links

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

WEbMD

Mayo Clinic

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Mother to Baby 

Breastfeeding

Baby Name Database

Menpoause

Mobile Apps

WebMD Symptom Checker

My Days-Period & Ovulation Tracker

My Pill-Birth Control Reminder

Ibirth Contraction Timer

 

 

 

What is Vaginal Prolapse?

Vaginal prolapse, a type of pelvic organ prolapse, is a medical condition in which a woman's uterus weakens and falls out of its normal position, causing complications. The condition is not life-­threatening, but it can be quite painful and inconvenient if not treated.

What are the Symptoms of Vaginal Prolapse?

Common symptoms of vaginal prolapse include a pull in your pelvis, pain, pressure, a bulge of tissue protruding from your vagina, and the sensation that something may be falling out through your vagina. Women may also experience painful intercourse, urinary tract infections or difficulty emptying their bladder or bowels. Some women, on the other hand, experience no symptoms at all.

What Causes Vaginal Prolapse?

Vaginal prolapse happens when a woman's ligaments and pelvic floor muscles weaken and sag. This typically happens as the result of childbirth, particularly multiple childbirths, and aging. Factors such as obesity, heredity, physical strain and pelvic surgery can increase a woman's risk of developing this condition as well.

What Treatments are Available for Vaginal Prolapse?

Women suffering from vaginal prolapse often have several treatment options. Women whose symptoms aren't severe will likely benefit from non-­invasive treatment options, such as Kegel exercises.

For women who have severe symptoms, pessary devices or surgery are often the most effective and reliable options. There are various procedures available to treat uterine prolapse, including tissue grafts onto the pelvic floor support structures. A hysterectomy may also be deemed a good choice depending on the severity of the woman’s case, and whether she is done having children or has no intention of having children.

Vaginal prolapse may be inconvenient and painful, but the good news is that it is treatable. If you suspect that you have some degree of vaginal prolapse, consult with your doctor about your treatment options today.